Jack Says Bring it Back to Sesame Street Level? (CFFL 0225)

Jack Says Bring it Back to Sesame Street Level?

Jack Butala: Jack Says Bring it Back to Sesame Street Level? Every Single month we give away a property for free. It’s super simple to qualify. Two simple steps. Leave us your feedback for this podcast on iTunes and number two, get the free ebook at landacademy.com, you don’t even have to read it. Thanks for listening.

Jack Butala:
Jack Butela with Jill DeWit.

Jill DeWit:
Hi.

Jack Butala:
Welcome to our show. In this episode Jill and I talk about Jack says bring it back to the Sesame Street level? What the hell. Great show today Jill. Let’s take a question posted by one of our members on successplans.com, our free online community.

Jill DeWit:
Okay. Carol wrote in and asked, “I’m having trouble understanding deeds. Is there a good resource out there? How do I get better at learning how to prepare a deed?”

Jack Butala:
That’s a great question. Why don’t we talk about the paperwork part of this enough member. Well, let’s do it now.

Jill DeWit:
Okay.

Jack Butala:
How would you answer that, Jill? That falls under your hat. I can say this, it was a hangup that i had when I started and I got over it. It’s way more simple than registering your car.

Jill DeWit:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). Well, my first thing is, Carol, get ahold of the last recorded deed which is the vesting deed.

Jack Butala:
Where do you get that, Jill?

Jill DeWit:
My first choice is get it from the seller, because they often are staring at it. They’re have it, they should have it right there in their file that they’re talking to you about and they have and they can take a picture of it, text it to you if they have to, scan it, email it.

Jack Butala:
This is Sesame Street level stuff, by the way.

Jill DeWit:
It’s called the vesting deed, it’s the last recorded deed, and you want to get a copy of that and that’s easy because it’s free and it’s right there. You’re talking to them on the phone anyway. If for some reason they don’t have it and you want to double check it also, so you should be doing your homework, next thing I would do is you got two choices. You can either go to the county, and some counties are great you can see it right online and it’s for free. Check the ownership. I shouldn’t say that, at the counties you can check the ownership but you can’t get a copy of the deed. With our data and what we use I can get a copy of the deed, and that’s my go to place.

Jack Butala:
It’s part of the data to do our step product that we have.

Jill DeWit:
Yeah. I can get a copy of the deed right there and download it for like $2.50 or something like that.

Jack Butala:
Then what?

Jill DeWit:
Now I’ve got the deed, so that tells me how I should prepare it. I can see grantor, I can see grantee, I can confirm that they own it. Now what I want to do is i want to copy and make a deed just like that.

Jack Butala:
Staring at a blank screen on the Microsoft word or whatever word processor you use you would just recreate the deed, that’s the answer. Exactly word for word, spacing, the whole thing.

Jill DeWit:
You want to make sure, especially, the legal description word for word, we’re talking in detail. It might be long, some are long some are short. I got a whole paragraph in there when they get into mineral rights not carrying over, and a rail road being involved, whatever it is. It’s not scary, just copy it word for word. It’s right. Just make sure, too, that you copy the grantee is now the grantor because they’re now selling it to you. Make sure you copy that exactly also and then when it comes time to the grantee now that’s you.

Jack Butala:
Yeah. Here’s a couple tips too. A lot of people get hung up on this and I pay close attention to it because even seasoned real estate people get hung up on it because usually the title agents doing it. For some reason people are concerned about the form and whether the form is correct. In most counties, not all of them, in most states there’s not just one form. The forms are really acceptable just about … They’re universal actually. What the recorder will really look at is what judges refer to. If a person who’s conveying the property on the old deed, the vesting deed, it is different from the person who is …

If the grantee in the old deed is not exactly like the grantor in the new deed that you’re doing they review that. Dot your i cross your t kind of review. The form itself, unless it’s really sloppy and messed up, they’ll accept that. This is the takeaway on this question, I’m really glad that Carol asked this, the worst thing that can happen is that the recorder sends it back and mailer says, “You know what? This just doesn’t work.” You call him and he can do it straight, you get it straight. It happens all the time, even to us, and it’s no big deal.

If you’re super concerned about it a lot of recorders you can just send them the PDF, email them, and call them and say, “Hey. I’m real concerned about it. I want to do this right the first time, can you just look at it? If it works I’m going to send it to you, if not I’m happy to make any changes.” Now you’ve separated yourself from every other dingbat who tries to send some stuff in under the radar and then they love you. If you really want to get something recorded at the recorder send them some cookies, they’ll record it on toilet paper then.

Jill DeWit:
Good point. Sticky notes on toilet paper, that’s how you do a deed Carol.

Jack Butala:
I got that from my attorney.

Jill DeWit:
I love that.

Jack Butala:
He falsely says that to his clients because he’s a lot older than me. “Oh. THey’ll record it on toilet appear.” I’m like, “Yeah. I don’t think that’s true anymore.”

Jill DeWit:
There’s things out there to help you too, Carol, but you do want to learn to do this on your own. This is a good thing to know. Good question. I’m glad you’re working on that.

Jack Butala:
We started a company that we haven’t launched it yet, it’s called Deed Perfect. This question is so prevalent and people are so concerned about it that you can put all your information for the deed … It’s not up yet, but it’s called deedperfect.com. For a small fee you just input all your stuff and then it kicks back a deed, it kicks out a deed that you can send to the county. If you really don’t want to have anything to do with it we’ll send it in for you for a different price. When we launch it believe me you’ll hear about it. If you have any questions or you want to be on the show call 887258816. Jack says bring it back to the Sesame Street level?

Jill DeWit:
Can you tell me how to get, get to Sesame Street? All right, where you going with this one?

Jack Butala:
This is the deal, somebody said to me recently, “Can we just bring this back to the 3rd grade level.” I did. I brought it back to the third grade level, because you hear that a lot. Talk to me like I’m in 8th grade, bring it back to the 3rd grade level. Well, in recently I brought it back to the 8th grade level than the 3rd grade level and then I …

Jill DeWit:
Sometimes it has to be kindergarten level, depending on who you’re talking to.

Jack Butala:
Kindergarten level and now we got it back to Sesame Street.

Jill DeWit:
Yeah, we did. Pre school.

Jack Butala:
Nothing to do with real estate too. The whole topic was sizing a graphic. You see a lot of graphics on the internet. In fact, if you go look at some of our graphics on the internet right now you’re going to see a problem. They’re not sized properly. It’s not the graphic that you size, and this isn’t about graphics. Sometimes you really got to explain stuff in great detail. I will explain graphics very quickly. It’s not about re-sizing a graphic, it’s about re-sizing the canvas that it’s on. If you start to plan with the sizes of a graphic you’re going to stretch it out and it’s all going to look silly. It’s not going to be how it was intended.

If you create a canvas and slap the graphic on it it’s going to look fantastic. I had to bring that back to the Sesame street level. It’s like math when you’re in school. You either get it or you don’t. You got to stare at the problem, you got to think about it, you got to do it 150 times, maybe you got to check youtube to figure out how somebody else does it, but once you get it you cross over that line then you get it. Then it’s just practicing and memorizing the rules. That’s a lot like computers I think. My point in all this is maybe i should star, Jill, at the Sesame Street level.

Jill DeWit:
Sometimes you do. It’s interesting because we have so many smart people in our world I forget. I don’t mean to say that not everybody’s smart, but there are some really brainy people around. Even though, then, me, I’m not getting it. I need you to explain things to me at the Sesame Street level. I’m like, “All right. Where are you going with that?” Sometimes it’s not necessarily how smart the person is but in my head or your head you might be three conversations down the road. We do that to each other all the time. I’m like, “Didn’t we talk about that?” You’re like, “No. We didn’t.” I’m like, “All right. You got to catch me up because I’m not sure what you’re talking about. I do it to you. You’re like, “Did you have a conversation with yourself there?

Jack Butala:
Oh, that happens all the time. It’s happening right now.

Jill DeWit:
Yeah, thank you. I totally missed that, where are you going with that. I’m like, “Oh. Yes, I guess I did. I need to fill you in.”

Jack Butala:
Jill and I were in the car together for several hours recently and every time this happens we turn on youtube and listen to Ted Talks. If you don’t know what Ted Talks are you’ve got to check that out because it’s really informative. One of the Ted Talks that we listened to was about communication. She was a great speaker and she said no one can communicate. I agree, we’re all bad at it is what she meant. One of the things that she said that I’ll remember forever is that human beings talk at about 250 words per minute, but we can listen at 500 words a minute. We get board. We always fell like, “Geez. Speed this thing up.” We start to think about the next thing we’re going to say. Really what she was saying is we’re not good listeners. I think that if you can bring it back to the Sesame Street level and I don’t care if you have to use puppets or be silly little songs. Jill you want to sing the song again?

Jill DeWit:
No.

Jack Butala:
Songs and puppets to communicate your point. I have a video produced right now, it’s like an hour glass. If you picture and hour glass at the top swirling down into a funnel. The hour glass is a bunch of pieces of property, like all the pieces of property. Let’s say 4,000 pieces of property swirling down and then in the middle there’s an offer, they get sent, and then on the bottom what comes out, six signed offers for the price that you want. I’m trying to bring it back to the Sesame Street level what this is all about. Does that make sense to you just me describing it?

Jill DeWit:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah, that was great.

Jack Butala:
I don’t event think I told you I was doing that.

Jill DeWit:
I love it. Yeah, that’s good. Thank you for that, too. That’s one of the best things about the way we do business together, you got your things going on and I have my things going on. It’s like, “Oh. That’s great, wonderful.”

Jack Butala:
I find out more about what’s going on on this show than anywhere else.

Jill DeWit:
That’s true.

Jack Butala:
That’s good.

Jill DeWit:
You let so and so go? Yeah, we did. No, I’m just kidding. Good stuff.

Jack Butala:
This is a technical two, to minutes of property investment advice from our 15 year 15,000 deal experience. If you’re stuck on anything including IT or land or deeds, check youtube. It’s free, people make money doing silly videos and a lot of them have puppets and stuff and I’ll tell you, you can learn … I have never been stumped about how to do anything specifically IT. As small as it is, somebody on there will do it and will show you how to do that. I learn that way, I think Jill learns a little more by reading. I like to watch somebody doing it. Hey, if you have any questions or you want to be on the show call 8007258816. It’s time for Jill’s inspiration.

Jill DeWit:
This came from a call that I had this morning where I was right here in California and I’m setting up new internet service for us and there was an issue. What I appreciate is the person on the phone and how the handled it when I finally got to a manger. What they did that was so wonderful, so I’m not assigning blame or anything like that, they’re just solving the problem. I cannot tell you how much I love that. My big point today is don’t walk around if something goes sideways it’s not going to do you any good to assign any blame and walk around and trace it back to who was the problem solver or whatever. Fix it and move on. It’s so much easier. That’s really what it’s about.

Jack Butala:
Well said. I just heard the phrase blame thrower.

Jill DeWit:
Oh, my gosh. That’s hilarious. Where’d you get that?

Jack Butala:
It was on a Ted Talk in the car.

Jill DeWit:
Wow.

Jack Butala:
Let’s not get our blame throwers out.

Jill DeWit:
I love that.

Jack Butala:
I guess it’s just showing my silly ignorance a little bit, but everybody on the other end of this is saying, “Have you spent some time in a vacuum?”

Jill DeWit:
I have not heard that saying yet. You know what’s funny is I was listening to the same Ted Talks too and I’m like, “I don’t remember that comment coming up.” That’s awesome.

Jack Butala:
I think that whole show was about listening and you weren’t even listening to what she was saying about listening.

Jill DeWit:
It was a little noisy in that environment if I will say. It was taped together listening environment. That’s good.

Jack Butala:
Blame thrower. Yeah, forget about the blame. What good does that do? Nothing. Nothing gets done.

Jill DeWit:
Right. Let’s just fix it and move on.

Jack Butala:
Yeah. Something else is going to happen 20 minutes from now and then you start the blame thing and it’s like, “Eh.” I’ve seen so many companies get wrecked over you know how in high school you had cliches like there were the dweebs and the nerds and we called them burnouts and rats. The greasers. What did you call them? The guys in leather jackets that were causing problems for everybody.

Jill DeWit:
They were the jocks and then the geeks and the band kids and stuff like that. We did call them that.

Jack Butala:
We called them rats, the guys who are smoking outside.

Jill DeWit:
That’s funny.

Jack Butala:
We had a smoking section outside of our high school and everybody who smoked … Way underage smokers, freshman in hitch school would smoke with the teachers.

Jill DeWit:
Oh, my goodness.

Jack Butala:
Did you have that?

Jill DeWit:
You know what’s funny? I didn’t smoke so I’m’ trying to think if I knew where and when it was, but I don’t recall. Was it a California healthy thing back then too, I don’t know my parents didn’t smoke either.

Jack Butala:
Maybe it’s a Detroit thing.

Jill DeWit:
I’ve never been around smokers.

Jack Butala:
This whole thing sucks so you might as well smoke.

Jill DeWit:
It’s a reason to get out of here for five minutes. That’s hilarious.

Jack Butala:
Great inspiration Jill.

Jill DeWit:
Thank you.

Jack Butala:
Join us in another episode where Jack and Jill discuss how we use information, that’s me.

Jill DeWit:
And inspiration, that’s me.

Jack Butala:
To get just about anything you want.

Jill DeWit:
We use it everyday to buy property for half of what it’s worth and sell it immediately.

Jack Butala:
Get here first with your real estate ambition. Some of the stuff that went on in high school really cracks me up now. I hate to hear old guys standings round saying, “Yeah. We used to drink water out of the hose, times are different.” That smoking thing in high school. You can’t even smoke anywhere now. They’ll call the police. That’s call the cops over that I think if somebody was smoking in a corridor. That’s hilarious. We had rats, like the greasers. We had geeks, dweebs. I wonder what they have now. Jocks, bandies.

Jill DeWit:
The cheerleaders, the jocks, I don’t know. That was funny.

Jack Butala:
Who were you?

Jill DeWit:
I liked to think I was under the radar back then. I don’t know. I’ll admit I was in band but I was in procession because I thought, “If I’m going to do this I’m going to be where the cool people are.”

Jack Butala:
Were there any other girls playing the drums?

Jill DeWit:
Good question. As a matter for fact, there were girls playing drums. I was xylophone and that kind of a thing. I was in the other stuff in percussion. I was in the melodic part of percussion, but it was very fun. My point is that’s where the drummers were the cools ones, by the way. The drummers were the cute cool ones and like, “I want to be with the drummers.”

Jack Butala:
That’s how it works in rock and roll too.

Jill DeWit:
That’s were I wanted to hang out. We had a lot of fun. It was really good.

Jack Butala:
Were you a tom boy? You are a little bit now.

Jill DeWit:
That’s a good question. I did preppy for a while, I did the shorts and the socks. I wasn’t really a dress person, so I have to say yes. They’re was never bows in my hair and I was never girly girl. You knew it was a girl, but I wasn’t a girly girl. I don’t know if I was real tom boy like, I didn’t skate.

Jack Butala:
Our number three kid has a little girlfriend with red hair and I asked him about here. I said, “What’s the deal?” He said, “She’s kind of a tom boy so there’s no problems.” He was totally honest about it, he wasn’t joking. That’s a perspective of a 13 year old.

Jill DeWit:
Am I a tom boy now?

Jack Butala:
Yeah.

Jill DeWit:
That’s cool. Thank you.

Jack Butala:
You have it all figure out Jill. You know when to be a woman, you know when to be a girl, and you know when to just … What you do called boat hair. You can get dirty when you need to and I appreciate that. THere’s a lot of women that just walk away from that stuff.

Jill DeWit:
Yup.

Jack Butala:
I really, really appreciate that.

Jill DeWit:
I can get dirty and I’m not real picky about where our hotels … If it’s going to be somewhere fun like downtown Masantlan I want to be in downtown old Masantlan. Seriously.

Jack Butala:
Jill is all about location, location, location and not so much about what the walls look like inside or whether there’s mold and stuff.

Jill DeWit:
It was hilarious. I remember that.

Jack Butala:
I really appreciate that too.

Jill DeWit:
Wasn’t that like an $80 a week?

Jack Butala:
We have some friends. Jill has some friends. I met them through her. They’re five star and up. When they stay at a hotel they don’t care about the location, they want the thread count in the sheets and stuff. These people are the nicest people in the world. My baby boomer dads a little bit like that. There’s some kind of separation of classes that people that are a little bit older they just want to make sure everybody knows.

Jill DeWit:
It’s so funny, I love it. They’re both like that which is so cute. It’s not like one blames it on the other one, they each say, “Yeah. No, we have standards.” I’m like, “All right. Good for you.”

Jack Butala:
Both of our surviving parents have that times 80.

Jill DeWit:
Oh, my goodness.

Jack Butala:
I think, don’t you?

Jill DeWit:
Yes. I do.

Jack Butala:
My dad, to this day, I have to explain stuff to him. We were talking about this yesterday. I grew up in a community outside Detroit that was relatively very right wing and wealthy. We’re in a community outside of Las Angeles that’s right on the water just like that community and it’s very wealthy and very left wing. I think both sets of these people have a different version of the same problem, they just don’t listen. They’re already made their mind up and that’s sad. How do you learn anything?

Jill DeWit:
That’s okay.

Jack Butala:
Yeah. Join us on another episode where Jack and Jill discuss … Did I already do this?

Jill DeWit:
No, you’re good.

Jack Butala:
I don’t know if we ended this show.

Jill DeWit:
This is the after show. We did end the show and this is the after show. We did.

Jack Butala:
Oh, my gosh. What’s causing this today?

Jill DeWit:
This is hilarious, by the way.

Jack Butala:
We’re going to keep this in the show to remind me.

Jill DeWit:
Just like a big blooper, I love it.

Jack Butala:
Information and inspiration to buy undervalued property and try to use a teleprompter.

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