Solving Partnership Disagreements (LA 1306)

Solving Partnership Disagreements (LA 1306)

Transcript:

Jack Butala:
Steve and Jill here.

Jill DeWit:
Hi.

Jack Butala:
Welcome to the Land Academy Show, entertaining land investment Talk. I’m Steven Jack Butala.

Jill DeWit:
And Jill Dewitt, broadcasting from sunny Southern California.

Jack Butala:
Today, Jill and I talk about solving partnership disagreements. Well, it only happens once a year.

Jill DeWit:
Yes, exactly.

Jack Butala:
It needs to be-

Jill DeWit:
As co-CEOs, we have this licked.

Jack Butala:
And we feel qualified to talk to you about the very, very infrequent disagreements you’re going to have with your partner, especially if she’s your spouse.

Jill DeWit:
Thanks. So here, my first thought was, what if we put that on a business card? I wonder who would catch it, like co-CEO. Number two, then I thought are we going to have business cards anymore?

Jack Butala:
No. No on the business cards, and I have heard of co-CEOs.

Jill DeWit:
Wait a minute. Last time I checked, you can’t catch anything… Well, you can catch stuff, but you can’t catch the COVID from handing things over.

Jack Butala:
What’s silly about business cards, really quickly, is that in this day and age, everything changes all the time.

Jill DeWit:
Right.

Jack Butala:
There’s… How many phone numbers do we have now, especially if you’re sending a lot of mail campaigns at different States and stuff. How many email addresses do we have? Nothing’s worse than getting a business card and a cell all scratched out on it. Here’s my real phone number. Here’s my real last name. My last name changed.

Jill DeWit:
I want to do that. That, I want to do. Next time I put a… I’m going to do that. I’m going to cross off… I’m going to put all kinds of changes, new number, then hand that to somebody. Put co-CEO. You think I’m kidding?

Jack Butala:
Yeah, and change the name of the company.

Jill DeWit:
Here’s… Oh, hang on a minute. Oh, wait, hang on a minute. Oh, that would be so funny.

Jack Butala:
Here’s the thing. You could look at it and say-

Jill DeWit:
I want to do that just to be funny.

Jack Butala:
The name of company’s changed. My email address has changed. My physical address has changed. My last name’s changed. I’m not married anymore.

Jill DeWit:
My phone number changed.

Jack Butala:
Yep. Turn the card over. Oh, and my slogan’s different, and I’m in the different business.

Jill DeWit:
That’s what I’m going to do. You think I’m kidding? I’m going to totally do that. I think that’s hilarious. Can you imagine? I just want to see the look on someone’s face. When I say “Here’s my card,” and I hand them it, and it’s all scratched. It’s a home for free, written with a…

Jack Butala:
What’s on there? Like the new… This shouldn’t be a business card.

Jill DeWit:
I;d be like, “Well, let me redraw the new logo I’m thinking about.”

Jack Butala:
When I talk to anybody, whenever we start, it’s just… When we run into people and there’s, what do you do? What do you do? And when you get through it and its like, that’s awesome. What do I do? I say, go to landacademy.com. No one ever says, “What? How do you spell that? What is it?”

Jill DeWit:
That’s true.

Jack Butala:
No one. How many times have you said, “Well, what’s your name?” “Steven Butala” “What? Kukala? Deendida?” No, just go to Land Academy. It’s all there. My entire life has been like that.
You know what frustrates me? I’m going to use this time to vent for a second.

Jill DeWit:
I’m sorry.

Jack Butala:
The next time you… I’m going to make this about partnerships.

Jill DeWit:
Okay.

Jack Butala:
The next time you walk into your partner’s office-

Jill DeWit:
This is good. You’re making me cry a little bit.

Jack Butala:
You walk into your partner’s office, whatever that means to you, and they’re on the phone.

Jill DeWit:
Aka, the back bedroom.

Jack Butala:
They’re on the phone. I want you to listen to the conversation, and I want you to specifically listen to-

Jill DeWit:
This is going to be good.

Jack Butala:
This is what goes on with Jill, and it’s not her fault. Jill says something like, “That’s awesome, Mr. Smith. Do you actually have extra property? You actually… I’m sorry. Can you hear me now? You actually, what? I’m sorry, go ahead. You have… No, no. Go ahead. You go first. You have extra property, not daughterdy, property.” This goes on for hours.

Jill DeWit:
Because of my internet? That’s not me.

Jack Butala:
No, no. Stop for a second. Please, just let me get through this. All right?

Jill DeWit:
Okay.

Jack Butala:
What the hell is the problem? I don’t know if it’s our country and how we all speak with each other that we can’t speak in full sentences? We can’t understand each other, and that it’s been, for some reasons, socially acceptable in any way to say things three times before anyone understands anything. I’ve had a lot of people recently say to me, “Wow, you speak in full sentences. I understood exactly what you just said.” Like it’s really the exception, not the rule. So it’s very, very frustrating because I know Jill speaks the same way. To hear her on the phone, and her staff on the phone, just having to repeat everything three times, and they they’re missing key parts of the sentences. I don’t think it’s technology.

Jill DeWit:
Thanks.

Jack Butala:
I’m not knocking you at all. I just don’t understand-

Jill DeWit:
There’s times it is technology.

Jack Butala:
…just the lack of understanding and basic communication, and what I think is sixth grade level sentences.
Is it, people just don’t know how to focus and listen?
I’m throwing it out there. I don’t know. All I know is that it’s getting worse, and worse, and worse. I’m sure technology has something to do with it. If you’re old enough to remember talking on copper hard line phones, for whatever reason, that venue allows two people to talk at the same time, the same way our audio video, our voices and our ears can process it in person. If you’ve ever watched four or five women, girlfriends get together, for the first 10 minutes of their conversation in a restaurant, every single one of them is talking. Every single one of them is talking to each other, and every single one of them was processing it and listening to the six people that are talking. You can’t… The devices that we’re using to communicate don’t support two-way conversation.

Jill DeWit:
That’s true.

Jack Butala:
It is very, very frustrating.

Jill DeWit:
It’s interesting how observant you are. I could be… I was out to dinner with my friends the other the night. We’re having a conversation over here. Two girls across the table having a conversation. We can be deep in a conversation and I’ll go, “Oh my gosh. You’re right. Good idea. I’ll get to that in a second.” And then, dah, dah, dah. I was picking up on what they’re talking about, too. Oh, that’s smart.

Jack Butala:
So I’m not… I’m lucky. I’m the luckiest guy in the world because, and this goes into this topic, I get to sit in a black hole for two days, create the perfect data set from low multiple sources and get out a perfect… Then it’s kind of like all right. I’m going to take a look at my calendar, mark it off. I did it. I got it to O2O, and I’m going to move on to the next perfect dataset so that these guys can close deals. I’ve had to have this conversation with my partners and friends recently, like, “Dude, just please stop calling me. I don’t want to talk to you.”
And the last thing, please don’t do this. “Hey Steve, give me a call. Thanks.” You can’t text that? Or, tell me what you want. “Give me a call. I got a great idea about a mobile home thing down in Pinel County.” Oh, now I know what the hell, and it took just as long. You could text that too, though.

Jill DeWit:
What’s the show about?

Jack Butala:
Solving partnership disagreements because I think a lot of problems start with people because they can’t hear each other, they’re not listening to each other, or maybe this, too. They’re not thinking about what they’re saying before they say it. So what they could say in maybe less than a sentence, or one word to a sentence, they’re thinking about it out loud, especially on a cell phone, with bad reception, and it just doesn’t come out right. Or, it comes out e.xactly how you say it. Let’s say that

Jill DeWit:
We’ll get more into it. I’m sure.

Jack Butala:
Before we get into it, let’s take a question posted by one of our members on the landinvestors.com online community. It’s free. It starts out fun, and then it just becomes a reality problem.

Jill DeWit:
Apparently Steven has a lot to say today, but I’m still going to get to the question, and then we’ll come back to Steven in a moment.
First, let’s take a word from our sponsors, landinvestors.com, the online community. It’s free.

Jack Butala:
Our lead company is our sponsor.

Jill DeWit:
You like that? Exactly.
Gary wrote, “In searching the forums, I did not find where this was posted previously so I wanted to share something as stumbled across at a Wall Street Journal article of June 30. First Street Foundation, a nonprofit, is sharing a no charge of resource for flood modeling. It can be accessed at floodfactor.com and reportedly assesses 14.6 million properties being at 100 per…” or excuse me, “at 1% annual flood risk versus FEMAs 8.7 million.” This is very interesting. It’s almost double. “The reason for the difference is said to be that the floodfactor.com includes parts of the country not mapped by FEMA, and also includes current climate data and flooding due to rainfall, where FEMA is focused on flood plain management. The entire article is a worthwhile reading. I’ve attached a PDF copy.” That’s pretty cool. Thanks Gary.

Jack Butala:
Why do we care?

Jill DeWit:
I care.

Jack Butala:
You care about a 1% annual flood risk?

Jill DeWit:
Oh, no.

Jack Butala:
No, I’m not saying we should care or shouldn’t care. I’m not formulating an opinion.

Jill DeWit:
Oh.

Jack Butala:
I think a lot of times… A couple of days ago we did a show on tools, what are good tools that are worthwhile and what tools are not.

Jill DeWit:
Yeah.

Jack Butala:
Why do we care for properties in a flood plain? Well, we care if it’s-

Jill DeWit:
Is that a real question or not? I’m ready to answer.

Jack Butala:
Yeah. Go ahead.

Jill DeWit:
Because I need to know what improvements I have to do with the property to be able to build up on it.

Jack Butala:
That’s all?

Jill DeWit:
Well, not me, but the next guy.

Jack Butala:
Yeah, for us, it’s like I’m making an acquisition decision real quick, right? The thing is in a flood plain. If you go to… There’s a lot of ways to get FEMA data. We developed NeighborScoop. That’s how I get my FEMA data. It’s an overlay on our thing, and it ranks it with percentages. 1%, a hundred year flood plain, there’s a lot of different… It’s color coded. You can see if it’s underwater or not. That’s my point.

Jill DeWit:
Right.

Jack Butala:
This all drives lending. Do we lend on land, usually? No. We don’t borrow money in a traditional sense to buy it, and the people that we sell it to usually write a check. So while this is great, and I appreciate the information, and now we know that it’s out there, and that’s why I chose to do it on the show, is it necessary? Here’s my big picture point. Question everything. Just because it’s this new tool that somebody put out there, it might be named Flood Factor. It might be named a NeighborScoop. You really need to, as an investor and an adult, question everything. Is it worth it? Do I need it? Is it usable? Is the information that I’m getting, are the numbers on TikTok? Did I really just get 800,000 views on a little horsey thing that I went across the screen on? I don’t think so.

Jill DeWit:
I understand.

Jack Butala:
That’s the point.

Jill DeWit:
I understand.

Jack Butala:
A 1% annual flood risk? A bank is not going to care about that at all, which is why it’s not on FEMAs radar.

Jill DeWit:
Thank you.

Jack Butala:
I would love to know the source of data that Flood Factor has, aside from previous-

Jill DeWit:
Yeah, what are they doing?

Jack Butala:
That’s my concern.

Jill DeWit:
That’s interesting. What if it’s the same as the NeighborScoop? Because we take the FEMA flood maps and overlay them on CoreLogic spatial data to get ours, so I’m super curious.

Jack Butala:
So just because I download, and along the same lines… Just because I download a dataset for a county that I picked a from Real Quest Pro or DataTree, I need to know where that data’s coming from. I know DataTree specifically has multiple algorithms that are contributing to that dataset, while Real Quest is generally, if not only, uses a county data for at least the portion of Real Quest that we’re using. So, you really got to dig deep and find out what’s going on here. How fresh is the data?

Jill DeWit:
That’s true, too.

Jack Butala:
Everybody, as a personality trait… Now I’m not talking about little decisions that they make that’s in our advanced group. They question everything, every single thing to the point-

Jill DeWit:
I don’t.

Jack Butala:
I do.

Jill DeWit:
I’m joking. I’m being sarcastic. This is leading into the whole part of the show about solving partnership disagreements. I’m saying, “Oh baby, I don’t question everything.” You know that’s not true. That’s why I’m being sarcastic.

Jack Butala:
Let’s get into it.

Jill DeWit:
Please.

Jack Butala:
Today’s topic, dissolving… Dissolving, so Freudian.

Jill DeWit:
Wow.

Jack Butala:
Solving partnership disagreements, not dissolving.

Jill DeWit:
Partnership agreements. This is perfect. Here we go.

Jack Butala:
This is the meat of the show.

Jill DeWit:
Here we go.

Jack Butala:
Boy, is it the meat of the show.

Jill DeWit:
You choose. Which topic would you… Which title? Please leave it in our YouTube comments, by the way. Would you prefer solving partnership disagreements or dissolving partnership agreements? We can tackle either one.

Jack Butala:
Okay. I’m going to ask you a couple of questions, okay?

Jill DeWit:
Okay.

Jack Butala:
Have you and I ever disagreed as business partners on what piece of property, all these properties come in, whether or not we should buy a piece of property?

Jill DeWit:
No.

Jack Butala:
Excellent. I have the same answer. Have we ever disagreed about what office space we should house our people and ourselves in?

Jill DeWit:
Heck, no.

Jack Butala:
Have we ever… I agree. I’ll just I’ll stop when I totally disagree.

Jill DeWit:
Okay.

Jack Butala:
Have we ever disagreed on employee handbooks, or hours of work, or anything related to like the administrative stuff?

Jill DeWit:
Nope.

Jack Butala:
So what have we disagreed on, because I agree with you so far.

Jill DeWit:
That’s a very good question. What… Style? Styles of doing things.

Jack Butala:
Information inspiration.

Jill DeWit:
Right. But, we don’t get in each other’s way, I don’t think. I know your role. You know my role. We just sometimes blend them a little too much. Does that make sense?

Jack Butala:
Yeah. Here’s what I think we disagree on in general.

Jill DeWit:
Yeah. Save me. I’m not sure where you’re going here.

Jack Butala:
Well, so far so good, so apparently we don’t disagree on anything.

Jill DeWit:
Apparently not.

Jack Butala:
Jill and I disagree on, and always have disagreed on, and probably always will have some form, what we should be working on.

Jill DeWit:
That’s true.

Jack Butala:
We’ve got Land Academy. We have all these tech companies like NeighborScoop and O2O. We have these relationships with licensed providers for all these data companies, and then we have our actual real business. Before 2015, Jill and I had one company.

Jill DeWit:
I know, and it was dreamy. One company.

Jack Butala:
Buy a bunch of real estate, sell it for more, go get a scotch. That was the whole company. People still ask me, “What do you guys do?” Hey, I buy a piece of real estate and sell it for more. They usually look at the floor and just say, “What an ass.” They do.

Jill DeWit:
Why?

Jack Butala:
Because they don’t believe it.

Jill DeWit:
Oh.

Jack Butala:
They don’t believe that you can pull up in the cars that we have and live where we live. It’s just…

Jill DeWit:
“So what do you do to it?”

Jack Butala:
Nothing. “Well, how do you do that?”

Jill DeWit:
“Come on. You have to remodel or something.” No.

Jack Butala:
“How do you do that then?” We send out a million offers.

Jill DeWit:
There it goes sideways.

Jack Butala:
“How do you send out a million offers?” Well, through what’s called a mail merge, and a dataset, and on, and on, and on, and then it’s over. “Okay. Have good day.”

Jill DeWit:
Yeah.
Then if they had-

Jack Butala:
It’s too much work.

Jill DeWit:
Their eyes glossed over. They’re like, “Wait a minute.” They don’t get it.

Jack Butala:
So I think… I was hoping we could get fighting about it. I was hoping this was going to be like a therapy session. We could have some revelations.

Jill DeWit:
Well, let’s talk about this for a minute. Solving partnership disagreements. So it’s really about… Here’s what I want to talk about. I’m thinking of people in our situation. There are plenty of people in our community that are partners. They might be brothers. They might be parents. I know personally in Land Academy, we have brothers. We have fathers and sons. We do have the husbands and wives like us, all kinds of different, interesting relationships like that, and some that aren’t even related. They just met. Maybe they met a live event with us, and they’re doing things together. Disagreements are going to happen no matter what. So, I’d like to talk about things that we have learned that we can maybe help you solving issues.

Jack Butala:
That’s nice of you. I thought this was just going to be about us.

Jill DeWit:
Thank you. No, it’s not just about us. So, I’m trying to think of what would probably be… Things that we don’t disagree upon, others probably do. I probably think that there’s partners in our world that they disagree on property. Let’s start right there. I’m pretty sure there’s someone saying “Buy it.” “Don’t buy it.” “Buy it.” “Don’t buy it.” “Well, you know what? Screw you. I’m going to buy it anyway.” I’m sure that that happens.

Jack Butala:
Jill, I bet you’re right.

Jill DeWit:
Sure that that happens. And then the other person is waiting for it to fail, to go, “Told you so. That was a bad one.” So, you can’t do that. What’s interesting is I have personally had deal funding situations with very accomplished advanced group members. Bad decisions happen, mistakes happen. They have made mistakes. For me, the best thing to do is I blindly trust them. I trust that you know your job. You trust that I know my job.
I’m using this as an example. It was a property that should have never been bought, A, and B, not at that price. I trusted the person. They were doing their job. They brought to me a deal. They had 16 reasons why it was a great deal. I didn’t even really ask because I trusted them. They had a good track record. And as it turned out, it wasn’t a good purchase. Am I giving them a hard time about it? No. I mean at the end of the day, mistakes happen. It’s okay.

Jack Butala:
The keyword there is trust, and you… That was exactly what I was going to bring up next. There’s like 19 places I trust you, and I think that I’d like to think the same is true with us. Why wouldn’t you trust somebody then? Well, maybe pick the wrong partner. Maybe they have not a good track record. The last five deals they did, didn’t work. I’d never heard of that in Land, but maybe that’s the case. Or maybe, just maybe you’re not at the self security level where you should be to trust anybody. Maybe you’re the kind of person that has to do everything on your own, take responsibility for everything on your own, and that’s it. And you know what? This land business is perfect for you.

Jill DeWit:
Because you can be a one man show?

Jack Butala:
Yeah.

Jill DeWit:
Okay.

Jack Butala:
We have multiple people in our advanced group that are a one man show that choose to use, for the remedial silly tasks, the Philippines, or some virtual assistant, or whatever. So, there’s nothing wrong with that.

Jill DeWit:
Part-time staff.

Jack Butala:
It’s going to severely limit the number of deals that you’re doing, but this business is set up for that. There’s no real overhead except… There’s no real fixed costs.

Jill DeWit:
Right.

Jack Butala:
You can do this at the end of your bed. So, where do the real partnership disagreements come from?

Jill DeWit:
Yeah. And I want… And then I want to talk about how to solve them because I know we have some great stuff.

Jack Butala:
Ego.

Jill DeWit:
You think it’s really ego?

Jack Butala:
Yeah. It’s very foreign to you. You’re shaking your head like… Because you don’t have it, and neither do I. I’m happy to be wrong. As long as we don’t do it again, I’ll take responsibility for everything. I just don’t want to repeat the same thing over and over again. I see people with a huge ego having to do that.

Jill DeWit:
It’s true. They’re too proud to say it’s wrong. I made a mistake and fixed it.

Jack Butala:
Here’s my whole thing about any kind of disagreement. I don’t care if it’s with your spouse, your kid or anything. I don’t care who was wrong. I don’t care what was said, or how it got to the point where there’s a disagreement. I care about everyone saying, “Yep, I was 50% responsible.” “I was 50% responsible.” “Now let’s just fix this. Hopefully it’s not going to take more than 30 minutes, and let’s just move on and make sure it doesn’t happen again.”

Jill DeWit:
That’s an excellent, excellent way to solve this stuff. That’s usually what we do.

Jack Butala:
Yeah.

Jill DeWit:
It’s kind of like at the end of the… First there’s a bitching session. Seriously. There’s a little bit of, “But you did, but I did, but you did…” I’m just being honest.

Jack Butala:
I can’t stand that.

Jill DeWit:
I know. That stuff comes up sometimes. Not all the time, but it does happen sometimes. You’re going to be… Even if you don’t verbalize it in your head, you’re like, “Gosh, darn it. Why aren’t we in this situation? What happened? What went wrong?” You have to go through that for a few minutes and then you come up and go, “All right, I’m done now. Are we on the same page?” “Yes. Of course we’re on the same page. We’re partners. Now, how are we going to get through this?” Then together, figure out a plan. I’m a fan of either you divide up the tasks, or if one’s better at one thing and one’s better at the other thing, and just get it done. The move on.

Jack Butala:
Then there’s peeves. We’ve all heard of pet peeves. That phrase is grossly overused in my opinion, because that should be one thing. You can’t have more than one pet peeve. You can have a lot of peeves, but this is my pet peeve.

Jill DeWit:
I did not know that. Okay.

Jack Butala:
So, Jill’s got some peeves. Here’s one of her peeves. When people rush their paperwork, and when I say people, I mean me, make mistakes. I almost always do with paperwork. Then it comes back two weeks, two months, two years later, like you’ve got to do a corrective deed or there’s all kinds of stuff, to the point where they don’t let you do correct paperwork anymore at all. That’s one of her peeves, and she unloads about it. She gets… and maybe probably rightfully so. It’s like, I’ve got to go backwards now. I got to undo this. It’s going to take me 16 times longer to undo this thing if you would have spent 10 minutes just checking your work, or asking somebody else to look at it, just like your third grader teachers told you to do.
She’s not wrong. So she can get mad about it every time, but she doesn’t. You know what she does? She finds somebody who’s great at paperwork, whether it’s in-house or outsourced, to do this stuff instead of me.

Jill DeWit:
That’s true.

Jack Butala:
That is how a mature adult in a partnership, social partnership, or in a professional partnership, in my opinion, solves it. Not beating the person over the head whose not into doing that task anyway.

Jill DeWit:
Because you know what? That’s a very good point. Thank you very much. That’s very sweet of you. You have to quickly figure out if someone’s not good at something and they think they are, there’s got to be a good way to let them know, and you have to be open to take it, too. There’s lots of things that you’ve said to me. You’re like, “Yeah, you’re just not good at that.”

Jack Butala:
What? Really?

Jill DeWit:
Yeah.

Jack Butala:
Like what?

Jill DeWit:
Well, okay. I’ll give you an example. You want to talk? You want to share? Here’s something really personal we’re going to share right now. You have recently brought to my attention in the last 14 days that my typing sucks, and I was adamant. I’m like, “Fine, smarty pants. You go online, find a typing test, we’ll both take it right now and share our results.”

Jack Butala:
True story.

Jill DeWit:
So we did, and he’s right. My typing sucks.

Jack Butala:
It was like, in the red.

Jill DeWit:
I type just five for what I need. I’m like, I’m no problem. But apparently I need to… So he’s like… He was telling me, “You need to take some typing tests.” I’m like, “Will you knock it off. I don’t.: And I did this. Okay, fine. So it takes a big person.

Jack Butala:
By the way, I did take the same typing test.

Jill DeWit:
He did. Anyway, it takes a big… I’m patting myself on the back because that was hard for me, really hard for me to admit that I guess my typing does suck. Just look the other way, by the way. I’m working on it. It’s so weird because I don’t know. I don’t know how to… Obviously I haven’t got into my typing 101 stuff again. I did take typing in high school, but it’s been a little while. Go ahead.

Jack Butala:
We’re at the point in our career, I don’t want Jill to… It’s very often that I come into Jill’s office at 6:00 or 7:00 at night and say, “You got to stop.”

Jill DeWit:
I know.

Jack Butala:
Jill, we’ve got to go have some fun, or have some dinner, or laugh or something. By the way, the reverse is never true. She never has to pull me off the computer at 5:00 or 6:00, ever. Like a goldfish, if I let her just work, she’ll work the whole time like a goldfish will eat until it dies.

Jill DeWit:
What’s wrong with me? I like it.

Jack Butala:
So, you know…

Jill DeWit:
But you know what I do? Well here, let me back up.

Jack Butala:
That’s been a disagreement with us. Let me finish this thought real quick.

Jill DeWit:
Okay.

Jack Butala:
So my answer was… This has been going on for years. My answer is and was to get to overstaff, and we do enough deals where we can easily have one or two extra people on our payroll, W-2 payroll, so that she doesn’t have to do that. Did it solve it? Absolutely not. She finds something else to work on, like a politician will find something else to spend money on.

Jill DeWit:
I like it.

Jack Butala:
And that’s her answer.

Jill DeWit:
I’ve got to say, I do. Well, you know what? You do a different… I’m just not a… This is the therapy. Here we go.

Jack Butala:
There’s compliments all spattered throughout this feed.

Jill DeWit:
That’s true.

Jack Butala:
Right? You see it that way, don’t you?

Jill DeWit:
I do. Well, you know what? The difference for me is, well, I’m sitting in my office is the same version of you sitting on the couch, looking at real estate on your phone or on your laptop, because I look at it like that too.

Jack Butala:
For research, yeah.

Jill DeWit:
Yeah, that’s what you call it, and that’s kind of what I’m doing. Half the stuff in my office, it’s not necessary.

Jack Butala:
You just happen to do it in your office.

Jill DeWit:
I kind of like my office. It’s quiet in there, and it smells good.

Jack Butala:
Unlike the rest of the house?

Jill DeWit:
Yeah, kind of.

Jack Butala:
Why didn’t you say that two years ago?

Jill DeWit:
I did say that. I have my candle in there. I have different lighting. I’ll tell you, I have a candle in there. I have different lighting. I have mood music if I want it. I can close the door. I have my own little private bathroom in there, and I’m about to call my girlfriend next week. I’m bringing Lisa over and she’s going to help me kind of totally redo it.

Jack Butala:
That’s a good idea.

Jill DeWit:
Yeah, totally. I like my office. It’s kind of my sanctuary.

Jack Butala:
Did we help at all in this episode?

Jill DeWit:
I am not sure, but man, it was long.

Jack Butala:
Here’s… Honestly… Not honestly… Cutting to the chase. Well, it’s too late to cut to the chase. What other cliches-

Jill DeWit:
That was 20 minutes ago.

Jack Butala:
…can I destroy?

Jill DeWit:
How about-

Jack Butala:
I think that comes down to this. This whole topic came up because somebody was asking us recently, “Why are you guys together? You seem happy.”

Jill DeWit:
You seem happy.

Jack Butala:
“You seem happy in a sea of unhappy people.” You know what my answer is? We know how to resolve conflict.

Jill DeWit:
Oh.

Jack Butala:
Jill and I can get into it like nobody’s business, and you know what? It’s almost always done less than 15 minutes later, and that’s the truth of it. I think people get into huge problems, both professionally and socially, by avoiding any type of conflict, not resolving it at all, and just jamming it down into your soul. That’s how you resolve partnership disagreements.

Jill DeWit:
Happy you could join us today. Monday through Friday, you can find us right here on the Land Academy show.

Jack Butala:
Tomorrow, the episode on the Land Academy show is called getting rejected by your local escrow agent. You are not alone in your real estate ambition. So you can’t make a title up like that because we just got rejected by a local real escrow agent.

Jill DeWit:
I will tell you the story, and thank you for tuning in. We hope you find our content valuable and we appreciate your support. If you haven’t already, please check out our YouTube channel and hit the subscribe button.

Jack Butala:
Your comments and suggestions help us create the type of content that you’re here for. Hitting the like button helps support our channel’s algorithm and gauge your interest for future shows. And you know me, it’s all about the data.

Jill DeWit:
We are Steve and Jill.

Jack Butala:
Information…

Jill DeWit:
And inspiration…

Jack Butala:
To buy undervalued property.

—————————————-

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to email me directly at steven@BuWit.com.

The BuWit Family of Companies include:

https://BuWit.com

https://offers2owners.com

https://landinvestors.com

https://landacademy.com

https://landpin.com

https://parcelfact.com

https://countywise.com

https://deedperfect.com

https://ownersdata.com

https://houseacademy.com

I would like to think it’s entertaining and informative and in the end profitable.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts.